A Solstice Experience; A Campfire Beacon and Fundraiser

I'm delighted to be working alongside Campfire Convention, artist and larp designer Nina Runa Essendrop and with the very beautiful Lauderdale House in the middle of the stunning Waterlow Park in Highgate North London to create 'A Solstice Experience': a joy filled ritual celebration of the Summer Solstice. This unique magical event is designed as a Solstice Beacon for London, a fundraiser for Campfire Convention and a chance to spread the word about Campfire Convention throughout London...

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Created on 10 Apr 2018

Let’s see what we can create together on these days; let’s re-imagine the world we’d like to live in and get active to make it happen together. 

We are delighted to be able to announce the Solstice Beacon for London.,.. On June 21st we will be gathering at the stunning Lauderdale House, a Tudor Mansion set in the grounds of Waterlow Park in Highgate, North London. 

This is a really special location and we will be marking the longest day of the year with a unique collaboration between Campfire Convention, Psychotherapist and Facilitator Jonathan Goldsmith and Danish Artist and larp designer Nina Runa Essendrop.

Together they will be taking you on a profoundly moving, touching, beautiful and magical journey: 'A Solstice Experience'.

 

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Thu, 06/21/2018
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Why you're never too old to play...

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Experience: I've played a game of tag for 23 years

'Now we are grown men, we don't run like Usain Bolt, so subterfuge and collusion have become our weapons'

As teenagers, a group of friends and I spent every spare moment at school playing tag. The game developed into more than just chasing each other round the playground; it involved strategy and cunning. But when I failed to tag someone in the last moments before school broke up for summer – he'd locked himself in his car to avoid it – I resigned myself to for ever being "it".

We all went our separate ways, off to college or moving away for work, so the game fizzled out. Then a reunion brought the 10 of us together again a few years later and someone suggested reviving it. Since we had busy lives and lived hundreds of miles apart, we agreed on three rules. First, we would play it only in February each year; second, you were not allowed immediately to tag back the person who had tagged you; and finally, you had to declare to the group that you were "it".

 

 

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Now we are grown men, we don't run like Usain Bolt, so subterfuge and collusion have become our weapons. Eleven months of the year are spent planning. Collaborating with a friend is where the fun is – we can spend hours discussing approaches.

I was tagged spectacularly a few years back when a friend popped round to show me his new car. As I approached it, Sean sprang out of the boot where he'd been hiding and tagged me. He'd flown 800 miles from Seattle to San Francisco just to stop being "it" – to shrug off the "mantle of shame", as we call it. My wife was so startled she fell and injured her knee, but she wasn't angry; she was pleased to see Sean. All our partners are good-natured about the game – they even get involved in the sting operations.

Some things we did early on we wouldn't do now – like when Mike sneaked into Brian's house at night, crept into the bedroom and woke him up to tag him, surprising the life out of him and his girlfriend.

Perhaps one of the most unexpected tags was during Mike's father's funeral. During the service, he felt a hand on his shoulder and turned to find Joe mouthing, "You're it." Afterwards, he said his father would have approved, because he found our game hilarious.

 

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Ralph Pettingill

I love this idea! I think playing is a fundamental way of exploring, experimenting and learning...